So just what does it take to get the wheelbarrow back on the road?

Here it is:

It takes at least two weekends, that’s what! Why? because you know you have a flat tyre so you take the bike pump down the plot with you – only to find that these new micro pumps don’t have the traditional flex adapter that fits the valve on the barrow. So the next weekend you decide to take the correct adaptor, only to find that it’s not a slow puncture but requires a repair… now you need an adjustable wrench or a couple of spanners (14 or 15mm I think), in order to get the wheel off.

Allotment Junkie, wheelbarrow puncture repair
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Allotment Junkie, wheelbarrow puncture repair
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Having got the wheel off, you now need a puncture repair kit – which means a visit to the bike shop via the cash machine… let’s hope that isn’t out of service! Back to the puncture: you need a bowl of water to find the leak, but the supply to the plot is OFF and it’s not turned back on until the end of March. In the end, you decide to take the whole thing home and fix there – its only taken three weeks and the wheel still ain’t on the barrow!

Allotment Junkie, wheelbarrow puncture repair
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Allotment Junkie, wheelbarrow puncture repair
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Get a flat and it’s one of those jobs that gets neglected, now I know why… don’t you just wish it was covered by the RAC?!  (other good breakdown services are available).


Content updated / edited March 2017

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